Jump to main content.

A bureau within the U.S. Department of Commerce
Newsroom

Newsroom

Press Release

U.S. Department of Commerce Invests $2.5 Million to Support Food-Related Business Development in the South Bronx‬‬


WASHINGTON – U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross today announced that the Department’s Economic Development Administration (EDA) is awarding a $2.5 million grant to the Council on the Environment, Inc., d/b/a Grow NYC, New York, New York, to support the development of the Greenmarket Regional Food Hub in the South Bronx. According to grantee estimates, the project is expected to create or retain more than 140 jobs and generate $4.4 million in private investment.

“President Trump and his Administration are diligently working to help empower our nation’s entrepreneurs so that they can grow, thrive, and create new jobs in their local communities,” said Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. “The Greenmarket Regional Food Hub in the South Bronx will support entrepreneurs and farmers working to provide a positive impact throughout New York City.”

This project supports the interior infrastructure of a 75,000 square foot Greenmarket Regional Food Hub, which will be located at Hunts Point. The facility will include a wholesale farmers' market, a cold storage facility, and a food-processing center that will benefit local farmers by providing a location in which they can sell their goods, and infrastructure that will allow food producers and mission-driven distributors to expand businesses.

About the U.S. Economic Development Administration (www.eda.gov)
The mission of the U.S. Economic Development Administration (EDA) is to lead the federal economic development agenda by promoting competitiveness and preparing the nation's regions for growth and success in the worldwide economy. An agency within the U.S. Department of Commerce, EDA makes investments in economically distressed communities in order to create jobs for U.S. workers, promote American innovation, and accelerate long-term sustainable economic growth.